The Labyrinth

The labyrinth is a model or metaphor for life. The Christian life is often described as a pilgrimage or journey with God, a journey in which we can grow closer in relationship with God, and in turn, closer to others.
In life, as in the labyrinth, we don’t know where the path will take us. We don’t foresee the twists and turns that the future holds, but we know that the path will eventually arrive at the center, God. Sometimes the path
leads inward toward the ultimate goal, only to lead outward again. We meet others along the path—some we meet face-to-face stepping aside to let them pass; some catch up to us and pass us from behind; others we pass along the way. At the center we rest, watch others, pray. Sometimes we stay at the center a long time; other times we leave quickly.

Lana Miller

What Is CMC?

Computer Mediated Communication or CMC, is generally defined as the use of technology to exchange, broadcast, or publish messages. It is difficult to determine the point CMC emerged but one school of thought places its origin with the exchange of prototype emails during the 1960s.

The founding of the Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication (JCMC) in June 1995 established a focus on social science research which includes communication, business education, political science, sociology, media studies, information science, and other disciplines in its purview.

The evolution of communication technology has radically changed the world several times during the course of human history. From oral tradition, to fix-type print, to telegrams, to tweets, how we communicate has repeatedly revolutionized business practices, made the world smaller, and redefined culture.

The last two decades have demonstrated an exploding pace of change as the Millennial generation, which has been immersed in technology since birth, matures to adulthood. The potential for exponential propagation of messages, in a viral-like pattern, is one reason for intensified focus on CMC. Virtual teaming, cyber-crime, and e-learning are just a few examples of things to be considered today that have only recently emerged.

How you manage your communication has a real and lasting effect on your success.

It Matters What Words You Use

Words are the only thing that has ever successfully changed the world is words

It Matters What Words You Use

orangeblogs.org a> • by Leslie BolserLast night, my daughters and I walked to our local park with a group of family friends. As we enjoyed one of the first official nights of summer break, we bumped into Emily, a young lady from our church who is home…
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Lesson from the Target Breach: IT Must Implement Two-Factor Authentication

Redmond Magazine

DECISION MAKER

Lesson from the Target Breach: IT Must Implement Two-Factor Authentication

Last year’s Target incident should be a wake-up call for IT to fundamentally change how they handle passwords.

Now that the dust has settled on the Target credit card breach — along with data theft at other retailers — I hope you’re taking a hard look at your organization and asking, "Are we stupid or lazy?" Frankly, with the high-profile Target case top of mind and security experts predicting more breaches are inevitable, "ignorance" isn’t really an acceptable excuse for IT decision makers anymore.

It’s time to scrap the way IT allows passwords for authentication. It’s no secret security experts for decades have been moaning about how terribly passwords are used. Two-factor authentication, which greatly reduces the chances of a breach, is still practically a trite phrase even though it’s been available for quite some time. Yet very few companies bother implementing two-factor authentication, or for that matter anything stronger than a password even though it’s easier than ever. Even Microsoft, which has offered multifactor authentication in its Microsoft Azure cloud service, in February extended that to Office 365 and plans to offer it in the desktop version later this year.

Target should wish they had used two-factor authentication. The root cause of Target’s breach was a password, stolen from an HVAC contractor who had access to some store networks. I’m sure that password was at least eight characters long and consisted of letters, numbers and symbols. That didn’t matter a bit, because it was stolen. The cost of that theft is likely going to be in the millions of dollars after the retailer covers losses, pays fines, makes fixes and so on.

An RSA token would have cost about $25. A software security token is a mere $2. And every organization — including yours — should absolutely be using these for all network access, including logging in from within the office. Using security tokens — or smart cards, or some other physical factor — can put a complete stop to the unauthorized access that resulted in the Target breach.

"But we’ve never been hit!" is the almost invariable counter-argument — and it’s one I’m sure the IT folks at Target heard a few times. But that’s the point — until you are hit, you haven’t been hit, but once you’re hit, you’re screwed. You don’t buy homeowner’s insurance because your housedid burn down, you purchase it in case the house burns down, and you hope to heck you never need to use it. But you spend the money because the insurance is cheaper than the loss should a loss actually occur.

Two-factor authentication is pure IT insurance, plain and simple. It’s a lower cost now, to help prevent a high-cost loss later. And it doesn’t take much to result in a high-cost loss. I mean, for pity’s sake, an HVAC contractor’s password was stolen. That’s not even a blip on the IT radar for most organizations it’s such a minor event. But look at what it enabled. It led to millions of dollars in fraudulent charges plus an untold cost in revenues. Tens of thousands of customers were furious when they had to replace debit/credit cards. Yet these are losses that could have been prevented with a minimal investment in security infrastructure.

I don’t care if you’re a small mom-and-pop, $1-million-a-year business — someone will find a reason to attack you, whether for financial gain or just to prove they can. They might not want whatever you sell, and they might not want your intellectual property — they might just wantaccess to collect credit card numbers, e-mail addresses and phone numbers. All of this data is valuable in the hands of criminals and your business is a potential source.

At this point, there’s absolutely no excuse for not having better authentication on your network, both for in-office and remote users. In fact, the next big company that gets hit this way — and there will be one, I assure you — should fire its executives for malfeasance. The facts are on the table. The outcomes are clear. The costs are low. If you get hit by busted authentication at this point, you must have done so out of deliberate spite. There’s no other excuse.

About the Author

Don Jones is a 12-year industry veteran, author of more than 45 technology books and an in-demand speaker at industry events worldwide. His broad technological background, combined with his years of managerial-level business experience, make him a sought-after consultant by companies that want to better align their technology resources to their business direction. Jones is a contributor to TechNet Magazine and Redmond, and writes a blog atConcentratedTech.com.

Job Opportunity-Documentum Consultant at Houston TX for 6+ months contract

Job Title: Documentum Consultant
Location: Houston,TX
Duration: 6+ months

Job Description:
Experience: 1-3 Years Experience in SharePoint and Documentum Preferred Skills: Documentum 6.7 SharePoint Web Part Development SharePoint integration with Documentum. The Application Developer is responsible for the analysis, design, construction, testing, and implementation of business and technical information technology solutions through application of appropriate software development life cycle methodology. The skills progression identifies responsibilities ranging from basic programming assignments to being able to function in a single discipline to advanced specialty disciplines such as assembly/integration, cross-discipline functions, data engineering, industry expertise, knowledge engineering, legacy evolution, or system infrastructure Constructs, tests, and implements portions of business and technical information technology solutions through application of appropriate software development life cycle methodology. Participates in standard business and technical information technology solution implementations, upgrades, enhancements, and conversions. Uses appropriate tools to analyze, identify, and resolve business and/or technical problems Education: Education and Experience equally evaluated for relevance

Priya Ranjan
(973) 967-3460
Priya.Ranjan

If you believe you’re qualified for this position and are currently in the job market or interested in making a change, please give me a call as soon as possible at (973) 967-3460.

You may respond to me via email but please be sure to include your direct phone number so I can reach out to you quickly. In considering candidates for our various positions, time is of the essence and we are committed to responding to our clients promptly.

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Thank you for taking time out of your busy schedule to read and respond to this message.

About Artech Information Systems LLC
Artech is an employer-of-choice for over 5,000 consultants across the globe. We recruit top-notch talent for over 60 Fortune 500 companies coast-to-coast across the US, India, China and Mexico. We are one of the fastest-growing companies in the US, and this may be your opportunity to join us!

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Sharepoint with Documentum Specialist – L1 Programmer — TX

Location :– Houston, TX
Duration :– Six Months

Description :–

  • Around Three Years of Experience in SharePoint and Documentum.
  • Preferred Skills: Documentum 6.7 SharePoint Web Part Development, SharePoint integration with Documentum.
  • The Application Developer is responsible for the analysis, design, construction, testing, and implementation of business and technical information technology solutions through application of appropriate software development life cycle methodology.
  • The skills progression identifies responsibilities ranging from basic programming assignments to being able to function in a single discipline to advanced specialty disciplines such as assembly/integration, cross-discipline functions, data engineering, industry expertise, knowledge engineering, legacy evolution, or system infrastructure
  • Constructs, tests, and implements portions of business and technical information technology solutions through application of appropriate software development life cycle methodology.
  • Participates in standard business and technical information technology solution implementations, upgrades, enhancements, and conversions.
  • Uses appropriate tools to analyze, identify, and resolve business and/or technical problems.

Kedar
Intelliswift Software Inc.,
2201 Walnut Avenue # 180,
Fremont CA 94538.
Phone : 510-870-0201
Fax: 510-578-7710
Email ID : kedar
URL : www.intelliswift.com

Project Manager Job Opening with Healthcare exp in Dallas area

> Our Dallas area client is seeking a Project Manager for a 6 month contract-to-hire position with a fully funded FULL-TIME spot after the contract piece. This position offers competitive compensation and full benefit coverage. If you are interested, please send an updated resume and contact me ASAP at 972-892-9084 >
> Primary Skills:
> Experience within Healthcare Industry
> Project Manager is all encompassing roll managing application development, network infrastructure, and portal based projects. > HIPAA compliance required
> ICD 9-10, EPIC is helpful, but not required
> Engaging personality is paramount and the right candidate can be trained on other skills listed > MS Project, Excel
> Does not need to be technical, but able to understand technology >
> The Project Manager is responsible for managing the portfolio of projects. Including project tracking, project reporting, facilitating project status meetings and supporting the delivery strategy for the overall team. The candidate must possess strong leadership skills because of the challenges inherent in enterprise project delivery. Both technical depth and strong soft skills are necessary to excel in this position. Building and maintaining good relationships with internal customers is key to success >
> Rhett Clare
> Senior Recruiter
>
> Experis
> T: 972-892-9084
> F: 972-755-8699
> C: 214-551-1347
> rhett.clare@experis.com
> http://www.experis.com

Women in Technology – Amazing Grace

More images Grace HopperComputer Scientist Grace Murray Hopper was an American computer scientist and United States Navy Rear Admiral. A pioneer in the field, she was one of the first programmers of the Harvard Mark I computer, and developed … Wikipedia

Born: December 9, 1906, New York City, NY

Died: January 1, 1992, Arlington County, VA

Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, VA

Awards: National Medal of Technology and Innovation

Education: Wardlaw-Hartridge School, Vassar College, Yale University